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20121129
20121207
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for the wealthy and quote, sticks the middle class with the bill. so with 29 days to go until the fiscal cliff, what would it take to get a deal? joining me now, men on opposite sides, grover norquist, president of americans for tax reform and robert reish, former secretary of labor for president bill clinton and the author of "beyond outrage." none of the three of us are beyond outrage, grover norquist, which is why i keep having you back. the situation it seems to me as an impartial observer here is that both sides have now made fairly ludicrous offers that they know the other side is never going to accept in a million years. that does beg the question, grover, why bother, given that both sides know where they need to move, why the games? >> well, it's not clear that both sides know. the week after the election, president obama was asked do you have to have the higher rates or could we have deductions and credits and he said he was open to negotiations. three weeks later, after thanksgiving, he shows up and all of a sudden there's a line in the sand on rates that had come out of nowhere, so
president obama has seen these polls. so if there is a fiscal cliff and we go over it, the american public are likely to blame the republicans. >> well, that's absolutely true, piers. we've had an election and the clearest debate and the clearest difference in that election was over the question of whether the rich should pay more and tax rates should go up on the rich. everybody who paid any attention at all knows that the top 2% are now taking home a larger share of total income and wealth in this country than they have in over 80 years and are paying the lowest effective tax rate they paid in over a half a century. we also have a looming budget deficit. so you don't have to really be a rocket scientist to understand that the rich do have to pay more. taxes do have to be raised on the rich and i think that's why over 60% of the public in these polls are not only supportive of a tax increase on the rich, but also will blame the republicans if we go over the fiscal cliff. and this gives frankly, this gives the white house and this gives the obama administration much more bargaining leverag
analysis, a, most americans don't understand what the fiscal cliff is or the impact that it could bring or do you think it's because they believe that ultimately we will get a deal by december 31st? >> well, as you say, it's a bit of a mystery why confidence is so high. it may have something to do with the housing market and house prices being up around most of the country. that probably does help confidence some. i expect as you point out that most people probably don't have on their radar how large a tax hit we could have early next year if the fiscal cliff actually materializes. so it is a mystery. it does seem like right now consumers aren't too worried about the fiscal cliff. >> at what point do you get concerned? it sounds like perhaps a risk of revisions to q-4 estimates to the downside at this point because as the negotiations grind on and we approach year end, it might reach more of the forefront of consumers' mind and they may pull back. are you concerned about that impact? >> i am. right now we only have october data in hand. and fiscal cliff fears really accelerated in novem
up on the wealthiest americans. and i don't really see them doing that. >> if the republicans say sorry, no way are we going to raise rates on the wealthy, you guys are willing to go off the fiscal cliff? >> if republicans are not willing to let rates go back up, and we think they should go back to the clinton levels, a time when the american economy is doing exceptionally well, then there will not be an agreement. >> but house speaker john bigger is digging in himself, admitting talks are going nowhere. speaker boehner also described the moment when secretary geithner first showed him the president's opening offer. >> i was just flabbergasted. i looked at him and said, "you can't be serious." i've just never seen anything like it. you know, we've got seven weeks between election day and the end of the year. and three of those weeks have been wasted with this nonsense. right now i would say we're nowhere, period. we're nowhere. we've put a serious offer on the table by putting revenues up there to try to get this question resolved. but the white house has responded with virtually
of the congressional black caucus, believe it or not, do not agree 100% on how to solve the so-called fiscal cliff situation. but, there is 100% agreement, 100% agreement, among congressional black caucus leaders, that we do not want an austerity cliff where we have -- where this leads to increased poverty and exacerbates the hardship for low and middle class families. and that the wealthiest individuals and corporations should have to pay their fair share of taxes. as a member of the budget committee and the democratic chair of the congressional caucus for women's issues, i have a lot of thoughts on the fiscal cliff negotiations. first of all, we must include a robust extension of federal unemployment benefits for workers. mr. scott, has there ever been a time when the unemployment rate, 7.%, has ever been this high and on a bipartisan basis, on a bipartisan basis, this congress has not provided extended unemployment basis for workers? mr. scott: if the gentlelady would yield. the practice that we would -- it is generally the practice we would extend emergency unemployment compensation for longer
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)